The Roma’s Struggle to Find a Home

Time has just ran my piece on the evictions of the Roma in Italy.

Another day, and another ram-shackle encampment where Roma once lived is gone. The scrap-wood shelters have been pushed to the ground. The tents, collapsed. The inhabitants, scattered. In Rome, the eviction of the Roma — a European minority sometimes referred to as Gypsies — is taking place with the full force of the law: military police, bulldozers, German shepherds. But, in contrast to the international firestorm over such evictions in France, Italy’s have attracted little attention.

Even as French President Nicolas Sarkozy tussled with the European Union over the repatriation of dozens of Roma to Romania (despite the name, Roma don’t historically come from the country, although many live there), the mayor of Rome announced the demolition of his city’s 200 illegal squatter camps, at a rate of three or four a week. This means another wave of expulsions for the Roma, who have faced similar efforts all over the country. Meanwhile, Italy’s Interior Minister, Roberto Maroni, took to the airwaves and declared the country’s Roma problem — and many here see it as a problem — “practically resolved.” He added, “The controversy around Sarkozy’s decision made me smile a little. For us, it’s a movie we’ve already seen.”

Read the rest.